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UFWDA Community Forum  |  UFWDA General Discussion  |  Membership  |  Topic: Supporting United « previous next »
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Author Topic: Supporting United  (Read 9410 times)
Todd Ockert
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« Reply #15 on: March 27, 2007, 05:26:05 pm »

For those that know or have met Del Albright, I am going to use some of his info.

J - Join all that you can afford to join.  State Association, United, Blue Ribbon.
A - Advocate our sport to others.  This includes friends, BLM officials and anyone that will listen.
I - Include friends, BLM officials on club runs or organized events. 
L - Letters to elected officials.  And as Del says, for every trail ride you do, we should write one letter.  This is his one for one campaign.

We need to do this more often.  If we see a rig on the trail with no club colors, or sticker for their state association, we need to ask them what club they belong to?  Then ask them to join their state association, United, or Blue Ribbon, because we need them to be a voice for us also. 

I also have business cards I made on my computer that I put on windshields of other jeeps in town to get them to think about joining my club.  I have gotten 3 ew members for my club by doing this. 

Look here for more info.
http://www.delalbright.com/Access/howto.htm

Todd
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Steve Jackson
Utah 4 Wheel Drive Association
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« Reply #16 on: March 27, 2007, 09:26:40 pm »

Yes, we do all these things and quite a bit more.  Money is an issue.  It's $10 to join our state association.  We can't increase the price by 150% to be $25 just to get membership in UFWDA.  We can barely get the masses to pay $10.  Most people don't understand the fight we face.  And certainly almost everyone doesn't understand the tangible benefit of UFWDA.  We are not doing a good enough job explaining this to our audience.  UFWDA is not doing a good enough job explaining this to the 4x4 community in general.  The idealistic wish to have a strong national organization that can provide communications and support for the entire community (equally in every part of the country) while effectively lobbying for our cause is worth the $30 charge to me.  But that's the overwhelming minority.  List 10 ways UFWDA has had a direct effect on the average 4x4 user in Utah (or any state).
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Steve Jackson
Past President, Utah 4 Wheel Drive Association
http://www.u4wda.org
http://www.utahoffroad.com
Chris Boucher
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« Reply #17 on: March 27, 2007, 09:56:56 pm »

Sell United to clubs and 4x4 owners in your area this way..

Compare United to the NRA.  Why do people join the National Rifle Association?  Do they trust that the NRA will do what's right for them as gun owners? I think so.

It costs $35 to join the NRA...
https://membership.nrahq.org/forms/signup.asp

Look at these benefits you get...
http://www.nra.org/benefits.aspx

Look at this description under the "About Us" section...

While widely recognized today as a major political force and as America's foremost defender of Second Amendment rights, the NRA has, since its inception, been the premier firearms education organization in the world. But our successes would not be possible without the tireless efforts and countless hours of service our nearly three million members have given to champion Second Amendment rights and support NRA programs. As former Clinton spokesman George Stephanopoulos said, "Let me make one small vote for the NRA. They're good citizens. They call their Congressmen. They write. They vote. They contribute. And they get what they want over time."

The rest of the "About Us" section can be found here...
http://www.nra.org/Aboutus.aspx

Now go back and substitute United for NRA, and access for firearm/2nd Amendment Rights, and reread this stuff.  Now substitute $25 per year for the $35 per year and look at the bargain we're getting.
 
What other organization is working for access for your 4x4?
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Steve Jackson
Utah 4 Wheel Drive Association
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« Reply #18 on: March 27, 2007, 10:18:32 pm »

To answer your last question.  Several.  Utah Shared Access Alliance is a respectable force in Utah fighting closures with lawyers and lobbying in the state.  It's hard to explain why we would send a huge check to UFWDA over USA-ALL.  But I'm not the one who needs to be convinced.  I see the value of UFWDA's mission and purpose.  It's the same mission and purpose that the state associations have on a state level and the some extent the same as what the clubs have on a community level.

I'm not at all trying to downplay or question the value of UFWDA, but rather play devil's advocate to provide a voice to the millions of 4x4 users across the country who've never heard of UFWDA or have never given UFWDA membership a second thought.  I'm involved deep enough to know the battle we're fighting, and the stakes if we lose.  I'm on board every national initiative that attempts to serve the interests of the 4x4 community while working to protect access.

No doubt UFWDA memberhship is a value for the reasons we've mentioned.  What people don't understand is how it relates to their personal lives and their favorite trail.  The tangible, listable, praiseable actions that have positively affected their lives (whether they know it or not).  That's the list I'm looking for.  That's the list to bring back to potential members.

Tell people that UFWDA is a national voice and protector of 4x4 rights, and you're talking about an intangible concept that seems distant and unrelated.

Tell people that UFWDA was instrumental in saving Trail X, passing Law Y, providing education program Z on a large scale, etc, and we've connected with a dissafected member of a persecuted community who is willing to join the cause.
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Steve Jackson
Past President, Utah 4 Wheel Drive Association
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Chris Boucher
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« Reply #19 on: March 27, 2007, 10:25:12 pm »

Here's a list you can use with your membership...

http://www.ufwda.org/landuse.htm

...or check out the latest issue of the Voice, there is a list in there.

Do you think this will sway some folks?
« Last Edit: March 27, 2007, 10:28:51 pm by Chris Boucher » Logged
Steve Jackson
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« Reply #20 on: March 27, 2007, 11:54:59 pm »

It helps, but I'm hoping for a "slam-dunk" action to point to.  While working in general terms on so many projects is necessary and part of the work, our potential members are looking for on-the-ground, tangible results.  Organizations work on issues in the areas where there are the most active volunteers.  That's not on the ground here where I live.  This list appeals to the logical part of the brain.  It's logical that these things are necessary, but that won't motivate the average 4x4 user to get involved.  We already know that appealing for donations "because it's the right thing" gets us practically no where.  However, we've seen that when paying for an event, buying a chance at free stuff (raffles), or soliciting donations to protect a particular trail with which the potential donor has a personal connection, we can have success in raising money (which at the end of the day is 98% of what we're talking about).

We need to "bribe" potential members with benefits they can taste and feel.  The primedia magazine deal is a good example, but nothing invokes emotive responses like direct action or defense on your favorite trail or area.  Even if we need to manufacture crises, we need high profile action.

As a long time fundraising consultant for non-profits, I never thought it would be this hard to raise money in a community that has such great demographics.  Most serious 4x4 users are financially stable with moderate to large discretionary income.  But we can't get them to part with it.  Telling them about the good work in Washington DC or good meetings with Regional FS reps is like selling Internet access to homeless people.  It's pointless.  We need to find another way to reach our target market with an appeal that they can't say no to.
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Steve Jackson
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« Reply #21 on: March 28, 2007, 06:42:54 am »

Quote
As a long time fundraising consultant for non-profits, I never thought it would be this hard to raise money in a community that has such great demographics.  Most serious 4x4 users are financially stable with moderate to large discretionary income.  But we can't get them to part with it.  Telling them about the good work in Washington DC or good meetings with Regional FS reps is like selling Internet access to homeless people.  It's pointless.  We need to find another way to reach our target market with an appeal that they can't say no to.

There is a point for consideration about "demographics".  I have been spending a considerable time on those issues for the past few years.  The USFS Southern Research Station has some interesting studies about various recreation trends http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/trends/

I have a lot of information gleaned from there and US Census studies about the shift in demographic.

Basically, the assumption that "most serious 4x4 users are financially stable with moderate to large discretionary income" is partially correct.  And, appealing to altruistic values is a hard sell. 

Now, the real issue is defining the "target market" for the "product" you are trying to sell.

For example, the UFWDA programs are spelled out quite clear.  The condensed version is:

UFWDA provides the following services to members:

4WD Awareness Program - This program is designed to instill responsible off-highway driving skills through education and instruction to novice 4-wheel drive vehicles owners, teaching owners about the components of their 4x4 vehicle, proper off-highway driving techniques, proper vehicle recovery, courtesies related to four wheeling, and environmental awareness.

Volunteer Trail Patrol - This program is to establish a formal network for concerned recreation and conservationists to communicate with other recreationists and law enforcement officers regarding crime-related, user ethics, and environmental problems.

Organizational Incentive Program - The purpose of this program is to generate support funds for partner organizations. Participating members “check the box” to send a portion of their UFWDA membership revenue to one organizational partner of their choice.

Communication and Education - UFWDA provides global communication with other four wheel drive enthusiasts, with local, state, and federal land managers, and with local, state, and federal legislators.

Legislative and Legal Advocacy - UFWDA members have access to the corporation’s full-time legislative advocate and nationally-recognized attorney working exclusively for four wheel drive enthusiasts to protect access and prevent road and trail closures.  UFWDA continually monitors, tracks, and combats federal legislation that would affect four wheel drive motor vehicle users. In addition, UFWDA partners with other champions of OHV access to protect access rights in the states.

Now, how do you "sell" these to members? 

Starting with the 4WD Awareness class, it is structured so that an organization can sponsor it as a "fund-raiser" or at least a benefit.  Keep in mind, everything has a price -- there are no "free" rides.  As the Awareness has a cost, by approaching a local business for sponsorship, the organization can underwrite the all or a portion of the cost.

Further, people tend to value what they pay for.  Providing "free" classes is an altruistic, feel-good effort.  But, the general public is pressed on a daily basis to take advantage of a "free" offer only to find that they will pay in the end.

As such, a class where the major costs are underwritten by a sponsor AND attendees pay a resonable amount can change the dynamics of the cost factor.

That same effort applies to the VTP or the other education programs available to members of UFWDA.

The core point is borne out by a catch phrase used by the environmental movement: "Think global, act local"

In other words, the efforts at the "national" level have a direct impact on what you do at the "local" level.  And, what is done at the "local" level has an impact at the "national" level.

For example, when an area in Utah is proposed for wilderness, the SUWA spends a majority of its resources advertising the need for that wilderness protection not in Utah, but in the "vote rich" environemnt of the northeast and mid-Atlantic states.

That is a classic example of "Think global and act local".

Within the 4x4 community, UFWDA does provide a voice for 4x4 concerns at a level that is not reached by the local club or association.  Because we can provide "numbers of perspective voters" (or buyers) we do command more attention than a small organization.  That equates to a focused demographic across a broad geographic spectrum. 

UFWDA was an exhibitor at the Spring SEMA show.  The Southern Four Wheel Drive Assoc provided a display vehicle and some folks to help staff the booth.  That provided the local association an opportunity to advertise THEIR association (and their alliance with UFWDA) to a demographic that sells product to their members.  In other words, SEMA is a trade show not open to the general public.  Everyone attending the trade show represents a specific demographic that is looking at the products offers by the manufacturers and evaluating how they can "sell" that product to their customers.

That demographic now is aware of UFWDA and Southern as organizations that provide a linkage to their customers.

Due to Southern's support, I was able to attend a couple of meetings with SEMA and the Light Truck Accessories Alliance.  That effort resulted in SEMA (their Marketing section) picking up the ball to develop economic indicators that will reflect a economic impact of OHV recreation.  That is a valuable bit of data that is not available.  And yet, every land mangement decision is required to use economic impact data in the evaluation of alternatives.  We will now have valid data to submit.

There are ways things can be done.  The success at SEMA was due in part to the support of the local association.  And, the locla association felt very positive about the benefits and exposure they received.  Their efforts to get the same type of exposure at SEMA was going to cost them over $1500.  They got it for nothing.  UFWDA has been a guest of SEMA for a number of years. 

Again, think global, act local.....

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Todd Ockert
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« Reply #22 on: March 28, 2007, 12:15:53 pm »

I think John has it right with his last comments. 
I am going to throw this out from my marketing class.

SWOT analysis.
Strenght
Weakness
Opportunities
Threats

Strengths:
  o What advantages do you have?
  o What advantages do you have compared to your competition?
  o What do you do well?
  o What relevant resources do you have access to?
  o What do other people see as your strengths?

Weaknesses:
  o What could you improve?
  o What do you do badly?
  o What should you avoid?
  o Are there some things you cannot improve, and must therefore hide, or avoid
  o Are there some things you can improve, but it would cost resources (time, money)

Opportunities:
  o What are the interesting trends you are aware of?
 
Useful opportunities can come from such things as:
            o Changes in technology and markets on both a broad and narrow scale
            o Changes in government policy related to your field
            o Changes in social patterns, population profiles, lifestyle changes, etc.
            o Events & activities, local, regional, national - piggyback on someone else's energy

Threats:
  o Threats from the changing Technological Environment
  o Threats from changes to rules and regulations established by the Political Environment
  o Threats from changes in the Economic Environment (inflation, currency exchange rate fluctuations, etc.)
  o Threats from extreme weather (Geographic Environment) - ice storm, tidal wave, hurricane, earthquake
  o Threats from the Competitive Environment
  o Threats from changes in the Social-Cultural Environment - demographic changes, aging population, gender issues, other languages, etc.

Maybe if we can answer these questions, we can all help provide some direction for United. 
I would hope that they answered some of these questions prior to looking at the reorganization they would like to undertake.  I support what they are planning, and think it will be good for the organization.
Most of the above is used for creating marketing strategies. 

How many people have OHV's that are not a member of a club, state association, or state association? 
I would bet 2/3's of the users out there are in the  above category! 
How do we get them to join one of the three?  Club, state or national organization. 

In my college marketing class, I may take this on as a project to see what I come up with.  I will then post my responses or possible solutions here.  Are they going to be right? 

I hope the above helps some people understand some of the issues we face as a sport!

Todd
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« Reply #23 on: March 28, 2007, 12:43:32 pm »

Quote
Maybe if we can answer these questions, we can all help provide some direction for United.
I would hope that they answered some of these questions prior to looking at the reorganization they would like to undertake.  I support what they are planning, and think it will be good for the organization.
Most of the above is used for creating marketing strategies.

Yes, we went through a similar exercise. 

Quote
How many people have OHV's that are not a member of a club, state association, or state association?
I would bet 2/3's of the users out there are in the  above category!
How do we get them to join one of the three?  Club, state or national organization.

One of the conflicts with this question centers around the term "OHV".  There are a lot of people that own a 4x4 that do not consider themselves as part of the "OHV" community.  To them, OHVs are ATVs and dirtbikes that disrupt their sightseeing, hunting, fishing, photography, etc.

I am more inlcined to believe that 2/3s is an under-estimate.....

Quote
In my college marketing class, I may take this on as a project to see what I come up with.  I will then post my responses or possible solutions here.  Are they going to be right?

Go for it!  BTW, my degree is in business and lengthy background in risk analysis and quality/process management. 
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Steve Jackson
Utah 4 Wheel Drive Association
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« Reply #24 on: March 29, 2007, 12:03:47 am »

Well, I typed a long lengthy post earlier, and then this forum crashed.

My general thought is that what I'm talking about is a simple sell.  The two or three sentence appeal that reaches someone.  It has to connect with them on a personal level.

"UFWDA is a great organization that represents the 4x4 community on a national level."

Will result in, "thanks, sounds great, I'm glad someone is doing it."

"UFWDA is currently suing SUWA into bankruptcy!"

Will result in, "it's about damn time, how can I contribute?"
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Steve Jackson
Past President, Utah 4 Wheel Drive Association
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Chris Boucher
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« Reply #25 on: March 29, 2007, 06:51:05 am »

How about...
 
"United is working constantly to keep trails open in Utah. 
Everything United does directly and indirectly affects access in Utah. 
The leading anti-access group has a budget 50 times larger than United.
The people who want to close your trails send in $50 for every dollar you donate.
United needs your support."
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Carla Boucher
UFWDA Executive Director & Legal Counsel
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« Reply #26 on: March 29, 2007, 12:04:18 pm »

My general thought is that what I'm talking about is a simple sell. The two or three sentence appeal that reaches someone. It has to connect with them on a personal level.
"UFWDA is a great organization that represents the 4x4 community on a national level."
Will result in, "thanks, sounds great, I'm glad someone is doing it."

"UFWDA is currently suing SUWA into bankruptcy!"
Will result in, "it's about damn time, how can I contribute?"

Thanks Steve for the idea.  Here it is:

UFWDA is fighting the following environmental organizations because they want to strip your right to wheel.  We’re fighting in Federal Court, in settlement agreements, and in rulemakings and agency activities so we have standing to sue in court later:

Friends of the Earth, Bluewater Network division (representing 69 other environmental organizations)
National Parks Conservation Association
Wildlands Center for the Preventon of Roads
Center for Biological Diversity
Sierra Club
Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy
Isaak Walton League
American Hiking Society
Natural Trails and Water Coalition

UFWDA needs your help NOW! 

Give to UFWDA by mailing a check today to
UFWDA, 14525 SW Millikan Way #22622, Beaverton, OR 97005-2343
Or by credit card by calling UFWDA toll-free within the United States 1-800-448-3932 (44-UFWDA).


I've also posted it here:
http://www.ufwda.org/smf/index.php?topic=547.msg2449
and I've submitted it for publication in UFWDA April e-News. 

I would have liked to said
"UFWDA is suing SUWA into bankruptcy", but there's never a cause of action that actually allows us to sue environmental groups directly. 

Here's hoping that our supporters react the way you said - "How can I contribute?"

Thanks
Carla

« Last Edit: March 29, 2007, 12:24:56 pm by Carla Boucher » Logged

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United Four Wheel Drive Associations
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Todd Ockert
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« Reply #27 on: March 29, 2007, 01:29:52 pm »

Carla

Thanks for posting this list.  Most I have heard of, and watch their web sites all the time to see what they are up too.

A couple of the others I have not heard of, and have not come up on google searches.

They will now be on my watch list, and possibly try to get on their mailing list to see what they are asking, or wanting of their members.

Thanks

Todd
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« Reply #28 on: March 29, 2007, 02:07:06 pm »

There is a misspelling on one name.

Wildlands Center for the Prevention of Roads.

Their focus in the northern Rockies from Colorado through Montana.

They do publish a monthly e-news "Skidmarks". 

One organization not listed that is a good one to watch is the Natural Resources Defense Council.  That is the main litigation arm of the Sierra Club.  They do distribute an infrequent informational note.

You can subscribe to their newsletter at:  http://www.nrdc.org

They do have "alerts" that are sent out by specific areas.

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Steve Jackson
Utah 4 Wheel Drive Association
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« Reply #29 on: March 29, 2007, 04:31:17 pm »

I would have liked to said
"UFWDA is suing SUWA into bankruptcy", but there's never a cause of action that actually allows us to sue environmental groups directly. 

This was just an example since I wasn't up for re-typing the lengthy post that was eaten by the forum.  What I'm trying to get across is how to connect emotionally with potential members when your length of contact can be as short as 3-5 seconds.  It takes very specific actions to make that connection with the VAST majority of people.  A few will understand the benefit right away.  A few more will understand if you can get 5 minutes with them to talk about the threat and issues.  The other 99% of people will say, "thanks, sounds great, I'm going wheeling now."

I must not be explaining this correctly.  These responses remind me of my initial conversations with U4WDA reps when they wanted my club to join.

Me: "What does U4WDA do?"

U4WDA: "We represent all 4x4 users in Utah!"

Me: "Great, how do you do that?"

U4WDA: "Well, we work very hard and are involved in a lot of issues."

Me: "Great, what specifically have you done?  What are you involved in right now?"

U4WDA: "Well, we provide a unified front for 4x4 users!"

Me: "Great, exactly how do you do that?  Do you have lawyers on staff?  Are you organizing monthly service projects?  What exactly are you doing?"

U4WDA: "Well, we're doing a lot.  We're representing 4x4 users across the state."

Me: "OK, well I'll come to a meeting and try to figure that out."

Only my stubborness kept me involved until I could actually decipher what the hell they were trying to talk about, then I realized that 98% of it was sales-speak that no one had ever spent time thinking about.  Now I know what's going on.  I know the value of what UFWDA is doing, but there was a little learning curve to conquer before I understood the threat, how we're fighting it, and what we need in the future.  We don't have that kind of time with most average 4x4 users.  We need to hit them with a 10 second pitch that leaves no doubt that they should get involved.

Tangible, visible, high-profile on-the-ground work = More community and user involvement

For example, I am working on something here to connect with the 4x4 users in the Salt Lake Valley (which is probably 80% of users in the state).  I can't go into details on an open forum.  How can I explain this example?  I can't really do that in an open forum.  Sorry, typing as I'm thinking.  The curse of 80+ wpm.  The gist is that at the end we can say, "U4WDA was solely responsible for saving Trail X, re-opening Trail Y, and legalizing Trail Z."  Trails X, Y, and Z are popular trails very near to the SL Valley.  Now, that opens wallets.  How we came to be able to make the statement is irrelevant.  The fact that we can talk about Trails X, Y, and Z are what matters.  Users are emotionally connected to these trails as they might be the only technical routes within 150 miles of their house.

What everyone is adding to this discussion is great.  The points are excellent.  What I'm talking about is drilling that down into very narrow and focused actions that have affected the users in a narrow locale.

I've got one I'll give you.  There is a trail here that could be re-opened with some legal muscle.  It's on FS property.  A private land owner held a piece of property that this 100 year old trail crossed (the beginning and end have always been on public FS land).  The private land owner (very prominant organization in Utah) requested that the road be closed.  It was.  The FS did a land swap and acquired the small piece of property in question last year.  Prime candidate for re-opening.  Because I don't have a fortune for legal assistance, I'm working on a long-term plan to re-open this road.  If it's even successful, it will take 3-4 years.  If UFWDA was able to re-open it through legal action (or whatever), then we can go to shows, events, rides, businesses, street-corners, etc and say, "UFWDA opened Trail Q."  Bam, 1500 new U4WDA members and 2500 individual UFWDA memberships.

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